Alternative Fuel Options

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Three Key Takeaways for Utilizing LNG as Fuel

Three Key Takeaways for Utilizing LNG as Fuel

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The journey to decarbonization involves several decisions regarding fuel options, technology advancements and operational improvements.  Industry-wide data shows that regardless of which area of improvement you focus on, fuels will play a key role in the ultimate goal of achieving emissions reduction. Determining which of the fuel options is best suited for your fleet can prove challenging.  Understanding this dilemma, ABS provides industry-leading guidance to assist owners as well as services and solutions that indicate the viability of your selected fuel.

LNG

As the industry’s more mature alternative fuel option, liquefied natural gas (LNG) combined with new technologies and operational measures can be utilized to meet the 2030 emissions-reduction goals.  When utilizing LNG as a marine fuel, there are many items to take into consideration, including:

  •  LNG is a dynamic fuel
  •  LNG fueled vessels require special considerations
  • Additional training is recommended for crews

The ABS Sustainability Whitepaper: LNG as Marine Fuel provides a practical approach to these items, supporting owners and operators in decision making for future ship designs, propulsion systems and fueling strategies.  

More LNG Insights: Whitepaper | Webinar

 

Interested in learning more about LNG as Marine Fuel, watch the on-demand webinar Dual-Fuel Technologies for LNG as Fuel: A Practical Approach.

Dual-Fuel Technologies for LNG as Fuel: A Practical Approach.

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Sustainability Whitepaper: Ammonia as Marine Fuel

Sustainability Whitepaper: Ammonia as Marine Fuel

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Ammonia

Ammonia is considered a leading contender for fuel options, offering ship owners and operators a zero-carbon tank-to-wake emissions profile.  However, there are also several challenges with Ammonia including its toxicity level, which requires strict handling measures, as well as a lack of prescriptive requirements.  Because of the lack of requirements, demonstrating a vessel’s capability to operate on ammonia is advantageous.  ABS offers the Ammonia Fuel Ready” notation for vessels burning conventional fuels but having design features suitable to permit conversion at a future date to a particular gas or other low flashpoint fuel burning concept based on existing Class requirements.

More Ammonia Insights: Whitepaper | Webinar 

 

Methanol

As one of the many fuels being considered in achieving decarbonization, methanol stands out with its current existing infrastructure since methanol is shipped globally as a commodity.  Additionally, methanol offers carbon-neutral potential when produced using biomass and biogas from landfills and wastewater treatment as feedstock.  Seeing the potential in methanol, the IMO recently adopted MSC.1621, providing detailed goal based and prescriptive requirements for the use of methanol as fuel and even includes a risk assessment requirement.

More Methanol Insights: Whitepaper | Webinar

 

ABS Sustainability Whitepaper: Methanol as Marine Fuel

ABS Sustainability Whitepaper: Methanol as Marine Fuel

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Hydrogen as Marine Fuel Whitepaper

Hydrogen as Marine Fuel Whitepaper

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Hydrogen

Hydrogen is the second zero-carbon fuel considered for the marine sector and it can support the development of a carbon-neutral economy in the future. As such, is seen as an important cargo and fuel for propulsion. It can also support the use of fuel cells for further efficiency and emissions benefits. However, hydrogen has its own challenges, primarily associated with the need for cryogenic storage and its diffusivity, which poses stringent requirement on the fuel containment and gas supply systems. 

More Hydrogen Insights: Whitepaper 

 

Biofuels

Biofuels are liquid hydrocarbon fuels of similar composition and properties to fuel oil, but they are produced from renewable sources (biomass) such as crops, agricultural and forestry waste, animal waste, or vegetable and animal fats. Therefore, they can offer GHG emissions reductions from well to tank. Their suitability with existing power generation systems makes them a drop-in solution without the need for equipment retrofits or vessel redesign.

More Biofuels Insights: Whitepaper

 

Sustainability Whitepaper: Biofuels as Marine Fuel

Sustainability Whitepaper: Biofuels as Marine Fuel

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Guide for Gas and Other Low-Flashpoint Fuel Ready Vessels

Guide for Gas and Other Low-Flashpoint Fuel Ready Vessels

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Guide for Gas and Other Low-Flashpoint Fuels

The Guide for Gas and Other Low-Flashpoint Fuel Ready Vessels offers a flexible approach for owners who are looking to commission conventionally powered vessels that are ‘Alternative Fuel Ready’- designed to be capable of adaptation to low-flashpoint fuels at a future date. The guide supports shipowners looking to build a new vessel or convert an existing one to use LNG, methanol, ethane, LPG, hydrogen, ammonia and other gases or low-flashpoint fuels.